Stormwater credit application non-residential

Suburbs

Are you taking steps to manage stormwater on your non-residential property? If you are, you may qualify for stormwater credits - and a reduction on the stormwater portion of your utility bill.

Tell us how you manage stormwater on your property by completing our non-residential credit application form. If you own multiple non-residential properties, you must complete a separate application for each property.

Some examples of approved best management practices (BMP's) for non-residential properties include:

Stormwater management ponds

Quantity control pond: An engineered man-made dry basin, designed to accept rain water from the private stormwater system. The dry pond acts as a pond during rain storms and holds water temporarily until the storm has passed. The stormwater is then released slowly back into to the stormwater system, such as nearby streams.

The purpose of this practice is to prevent erosion along river banks and flooding of the river. Annual maintenance is required to ensure the pond is functioning properly. Quantity control ponds can also be designed to provide quality control.

Quality control pond: An engineered man-made pond that accepts rain water from the private stormwater system. Sediments from polluted stormwater settle to the bottom of the pond, filtering out pollutants. Clean water is then slowly released back to the city's stormwater system or nearby streams.

Annual maintenance is required to ensure the pond is functioning as designed. Quality control ponds can also be designed to provide quantity control.

Oil grit separators

A stormwater drain located on a road or parking lot that has an engineered unit underneath, designed to separate oil and grit from stormwater before it enters our stormwater system. Oil and grit separators require professional installation and are often located on large commercial properties as a requirement at the time of development.

These units can also be installed relatively easily anytime. This practice helps improve the quality of water in our streams and rivers. Typically, oil and grit separators need to be cleaned annually.

Rooftop storage

Some commercial and industrial properties have a flat rooftop that is specifically designed to act as a pond that stores stormwater during large rainfalls. The roof contains drains that release the stored water slowly into our stormwater drainage system.

This practice helps to prevent flooding along rivers and reduces erosion along the banks of our rivers and streams. Roof drains need to be kept clear of debris to ensure stormwater is released from the roof at the designed rate.

Underground storage

Some commercial and industrial properties store stormwater from rooftops and/or parking lots in underground storage containers (large cisterns) or oversized sewers (super pipes). Underground storage can be used to harvest water for onsite uses, or to promote infiltration of stormwater into the ground where soils permit. The overflow water is slowly released to our stormwater system.

This practice helps prevent flooding and erosion along our watercourses. Little maintenance is required, other than keeping debris out of the system and ensuring the pipes are in good condition.

Parking lot storage

The parking lots of many commercial and industrial sites are designed to pool a small amount of stormwater on the surface, creating ponding up to 0.30 metres deep in low-traffic areas. The parking lot drains are designed to release the stored water slowly into to our stormwater system.

This practice helps reduce flooding and erosion along the banks of streams and rivers. Little maintenance is required other keeping debris out of the system and ensuring the system is functioning properly.

Filter strips

A filter strip is a low-tech, cost-effective method of improving the quality of stormwater runoff. A filter strip is a strip of vegetation that is placed along the edges of a parking lot or another asphalt surface to capture and remove pollution from rain water. Filter strips appear as a row of vegetation and can easily be installed by leaving an area of approximately 10 metres of unmowed grass where stormwater is directed. Reducing lawn areas and increasing an unmowed border is effective for both pollutant reduction and to help stormwater absorb into the ground naturally.

This practice helps improve the quality of water in our streams and rivers. A filter strip requires some maintenance, including inspection, reseeding, soil testing and control of trees, bushes and weeds. The grading of the property needs to be designed specifically to direct stormwater to the filter strips. The strips should not be confused with un-maintained property boundaries.

Paved area sweeping program

Regular mechanical sweeping of paved areas can help reduce the amount of dirt, debris and sediment entering storm drains. Qualifying for this practice requires a detailed paved area sweeping plan, which must include the areas to be swept, frequency and disposal methods.

This practice helps improve the quality of water in our streams and rivers. The paved area sweeping program must meet our criteria and submission requirements.

Salt management plan

Reducing the use of salt in the winter helps to improve water quality. Approved salt management plans require a detailed outline of how salt use will be reduced during winter months.

This practice helps improve the quality of water in our streams, rivers -- and our drinking water. The salt management plan must meet our criteria and submission requirements.

Here's a list of local contractors who can help you implement stormwater management best practices on your property.

Stormwater savings

If eligible, you can receive up to 45 per cent off of the stormwater portion of your utility bill; your reduction is based on:

the quantity of stormwater diverted from the municipal system,

the quality of the stormwater entering the municipal system from your property, and

Your efforts to help us share information about stormwater management and its impact on the environment.

The following table outlines the rebate levels you will qualify for by implementing stormwater best management practices.

Non-residential credit values

Credit type

BMP examples

Maximum credit

Quantity

Quantity control pad, parking lot storage, rooftop storage

25%

Quality

Filter strip, paved area sweeping program, salt management program

15% - Enhanced

10% - Normal

5% - Basic

Education

Employee, customer, student education program

5%

Note: A non-residential property can get credit from each credit type; quantity, quality and education.

 

Completed applications can be emailed to stormwater@kitchener.ca. Paper copies can be submitted by mail or in person to the address included on the form. Paper copies of the application are also available for pick up at City Hall.

Additional resources

Education credit information

Paved area sweeping program information

Salt management plan information

Non-residential credit application FAQs

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